Thursday, January 22, 2015

Four divers charged with raiding ancient shipwreck

A southern Finland district prosecutor has pressed charges against four men for allegedly stealing from a shipwreck protected by antiquities law. The suspected wreck raid took place in 2011.

The Itä-Uusimaa district prosecutor said that the four Finnish men were not remanded in custody once charges were laid. However the prosecutor remained tight-lipped about what the men were believed to have taken from the sunken vessel.

The case came to light following a request for a criminal investigation by the National Board of Antiquities. Curator Maija Matikka described the wreck as being located in the open sea near Porvoo, some 40 metres beneath the surface. The wreck had been discovered by the Finnish Maritime Administration in 2004.

“It was a wooden ship, about 26 metres long and seven metres wide,” Matikka said.
No precise information about shipwreck








The ship had lain on the ocean floor for hundreds of years, once sported three masts and was believed to be carrying a cargo of hemp when it sank. The museum curator said the vessel was a typical shipwreck in the sense that there was no precise information about its age, when it went down or its origin.

“It could be from the 1700s or the 1800s,” she speculated.

According to antiquities law all shipwrecks are considered the property of the state if their owners are not known and if they have been lying under water for more than a century.

Back in 2011 the National Board of Antiquities lodged four requests for criminal investigations concerning the same wreck. It made another two requests in 2012 and 2013, but no charges were filed as a result of any of these complaints.

Matikka said that similar cases have been tried in court in Sweden.

Reference: http://yle.fi/uutiset/four_divers_charged_with_raiding_ancient_shipwreck/7542180

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

3,500-year-old sword discovered by dive club in Shannon River

A diver from Offaly recovered a Bronze Age sword from the Shannon River last Thursday, and it is believed to be approximately 3,500 years old.

Michael O’Ruiarc of Shannonside Sub Aqua Club, a native of Banagher, Co. Offaly where the 1050 BC sword was found, stumbled upon the precious artifact during a routine search and recovery exercise.
Dr. Andy Halpin, assistant keeper of Irish Antiquities at the National Museum, confirmed the sword’s age.
“We know that there is a lot of historical evidence of Viking activity on the Shannon in the 9th and 10th centuries, however from the 10th century onwards, there is also evidence that Irish kings especially Brian Boru had ships on the Shannon,” Halpin told the Irish Independent.



Divers of the Shannonside Aqua Club have recovered Celt and Viking swords from the Shannon in the past, but it was O’Ruiarc’s first time recovering such a striking artifact that is such an important part of Irish history.
“Two of my diving buddies who are also members of Shannonside Sub Aqua Club have recovered period swords from the river Shannon over the last number of years, so I’m delighted to have eventually found one myself,” he said.
The National Museum of Ireland is currently exhibiting a 1,000 year old Viking sword which was found in the Shannon in 2012 as part of an exhibition commemorating the Battle of Clontarf, which is running through December at its Museum of Archaeology in Dublin.
“We struck lucky again!” the diving club posted to Facebook. “The National Museum should really consider giving our divers a full time position in their underwater unit.”

Reference: http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/3500-year-old-sword-discovered-by-dive-club-in-Shannon-River.html



Thursday, January 15, 2015

Scuba Choice Thursday Features: Spearfishing Gear and Accessories


Cressi Speargun Bag 66" x 11"


Cressi Apache Speargun

Cressi Geronimo Elite Camo Speargun Size 105cm





Cressi Alligator 2 in 1 Scissors + Knife w/ Sheath









Tuesday, January 13, 2015

What Celebrities Think about Scuba Diving



Scuba diving is not for everyone, especially not those who get claustrophobic when completely submerged underwater. But a lot of people, including celebrities, swear it is an enjoyable activity. Some personalities, however, just know how to do it, but not love to do it. For the keen divers, scuba diving is more than just taking the plunge and mingling with the fish once in a while. 

It is a fitness activity
Jessica Alba, Nina Dobrev and Sandra Bullock scuba dive to stay fit. Although it’s not as taxing as surfing or waterskiing, diving actually provides a full body workout that burns tons of calories, improve breathing and tone muscles. According to a director of communications for PADI, Theresa Kaplan, "Scuba diving provides a full body workout that combines cardio and strength training”. Considering the venue where you work out, diving to stay fit is more fun than hard work. 



It is an escape
Emma Thompson tried diving because her husband, Greg Wise, has been scuba diving for a long time. She has not stopped diving ever since, only taking a pause when her daughter was still very little. She described her first dive as “being in a different world” and basking in a relaxing feeling that the vast nothingness brings about. Patrick Stewart, the famous Professor X in the movie X-Men, has a rather naughty description about diving, comparing his first dive to be “better than sex”. 



With the life that celebrities lead, with some of them deprived of their privacy, diving deep into the ocean with just the fish and squid for company provides the perfect getaway.  

It is something to be proud of
Jessica Biel shouted to the whole world, or make that tweeted, her completion of advanced diving course with PADI. Apart from being an impressive actress, she is now a certified diver. What more could be better than that? With an opportunity to scuba dive solo, even non-celebrities would be proud of such an accomplishment. 

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Spearfishing Guide when in Hawaii

Hawaiians take pride in spearing their own fish, so don't expect to lumber into the waves with a pole spear and come back with dinner for six an hour later. Spearfishing takes skill, experience and the right equipment. Pole spears or Hawaiian slings are used near shore, with latex-band powered big guns used for bluewater big game.

Reef and Inshore Equipment

Be careful not to stand on or damage coral when spearfishing.
Most spearfishermen are free divers, not scuba divers. Free divers can move more quickly and silently through the water. Learning to hold your breath for one to two minutes under water is a big advantage. Beside the mask, fins and snorkel for free diving, you need a spear. The basic spear for inshore fishing is a pole spear with a latex loop attached at the blunt end. There are two types of pole spear: lightweight fiberglass that moves quickly when shot, and heavier aluminum or thick fiberglass that needs a heavier latex band but delivers more punch. Most pole spears are outfitted with removable points. You can also use a spear gun for spearfishing inshore. Appropriate length shafts are between 24 and 48 inches. Free shafts travel farther but are sometimes lost in fish big enough to swim away with them. Over-powered spear guns will send a spear straight through a fish--lost unless the spear is attached by a line to the gun.



Bluewater Spearfishing Equipment
 
Offshore bluewater spearfishermen usually prefer wood-stock spearguns with long spears and detachable tips. The spears are always attached to the gun by a line, sometimes by a long line on a reel attached to the gun. For big game, the gun is attached to a buoy by a long rope (at least as long as the spearfisherman can dive). The spearfisherman spears the fish, holds on to the gun as long as he can, and then lets go. He finds the buoy, gun and fish by following the buoy from the surface.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6496919_spearfishing-hawaii.html


Offshore bluewater spearfishermen usually prefer wood-stock spearguns with long spears and detachable tips. The spears are always attached to the gun by a line, sometimes by a long line on a reel attached to the gun. For big game, the gun is attached to a buoy by a long rope (at least as long as the spearfisherman can dive). The spearfisherman spears the fish, holds on to the gun as long as he can, and then lets go. He finds the buoy, gun and fish by following the buoy from the surface.



Spear Tips



Most pole spears are outfitted with "rock point" tips that are about as sharp as a crayon, but can take the abuse of being shot against a reef or rock. They will easily penetrate a fish if shot within range. For smaller fish, use a "paralyzer" tip--three long prongs that are splayed apart at the ends. Smaller fish can be speared with a single prong or all three. Shoot larger fish with a paralyzer; as the tips enter the fish, they grab the flesh and hold tight. Paralyzers are more forgiving then rock tips because your aim doesn't have to be as good. Trident (three prongs like a fork) are OK over sandy beaches but are generally inferior to paralyzer tips for most purposes. For offshore bluewaterspearfishing, detachable tips are a must. Larger fish can break a spear or wedge it out of their bodies unless the tip detaches. Detachable tips are attached to the shaft with a wire.

Marine Life Conservation


Spearfishermen have to obey the same size and bag limits as any fisherman. There are closed seasons for many species. Remember that objects are magnified about 25 percent underwater, so if you think the fish might be undersized, do not shoot the fish. It is illegal to spear lobster or any other crustacean, turlte or marine mammal in Hawai'i. It is illegal to fish in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Various areas are designated as sanctuaries or marine life conservation districts (MLCDs). See Resources for a link to updates on regulated fishing areas.

Safety


Always load and discharge a latex-powered gun in the water. Don't spearfish in limited visibility. Free divers as well as scuba divers are required to display a dive flag. Locals usually use a lifeguard float with a flag on top. Store bloody fish out of contact with the water to avoid problems with sharks.

Clean Shots


The worst place to shoot a fish is in the belly. This is the easiest, largest area to aim for, but this spoils the meat and doesn't kill the fish. The best place to hit a fish is at the top of the gill flap at the back of the head. This will usually kill a fish instantly and avoid struggling, escape and potential loss of gear. Practice with your gun or pole spear before attempting to spearfish.





Hawaiians take pride in spearing their own fish, so don't expect to lumber into the waves with a pole spear and come back with dinner for six an hour later. Spearfishing takes skill, experience and the right equipment. Pole spears or Hawaiian slings are used near shore, with latex-band powered big guns used for bluewater big game.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6496919_spearfishing-hawaii.html
Hawaiians take pride in spearing their own fish, so don't expect to lumber into the waves with a pole spear and come back with dinner for six an hour later. Spearfishing takes skill, experience and the right equipment. Pole spears or Hawaiian slings are used near shore, with latex-band powered big guns used for bluewater big game.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6496919_spearfishing-hawaii.html
Reference: http://www.ehow.com/about_6496919_spearfishing-hawaii.html
Hawaiians take pride in spearing their own fish, so don't expect to lumber into the waves with a pole spear and come back with dinner for six an hour later. Spearfishing takes skill, experience and the right equipment. Pole spears or Hawaiian slings are used near shore, with latex-band powered big guns used for bluewater big game.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/about_6496919_spearfishing-hawaii.html