Thursday, November 20, 2014

How to Buy Plus Size SCUBA Gear

Scuba diving is a sport for all ages, genders and sizes of people. There are few limitations in scuba when it comes to size, except in finding appropriately sized gear. With the average size of both American women and men increasing, some retailers are keeping pace with the trend. If you're looking for plus size scuba suits, gloves and more, there are ways to find exactly what you're looking for.

Steps

1. Figure your dimensions. Use a measuring tape to measure each part of your body that will be covered by scuba gear: arms, chest, waist, hip and thigh. For better accuracy, ask a friend or spouse to do the measuring. Write down your measurements and use them when shopping for gear.

2. Determine your scuba needs. The temperatures where you plan to dive dictate what type of wetsuit and other gear you might need.

3. Research scuba gear companies. You can find dive retailers on the Internet or in the phone book. Most online retailers will have size charts featuring average sizes along with the measurements on which they are based. O'Neill and Body Glove offer lines of men's wetsuits--both short and long--in sizes up to 3XL. O'Neill carries women's sizes up to size 16. Diveintoscuba.com offers plus size unisex suits up to a 6XL. Online auction sites, such as eBay, also might offer plus size dive gear for sale.

4. Check local dive shops and stores that carry scuba equipment. Try on some suits and take note of the fit. Just because a suit is marked as one size does not mean it won't fit you. You can get a better idea of what you need by trying on suits, gloves and other gear. The shop also might be able to order larger sizes or suggest where you could go to find them.


5. Most weight belts, gloves and masks have adjustable straps and can be made to fit any size head, waist and hands. Dive fins have some room to stretch around the foot bed and can expand to fit most foot widths. Brands such as Mares and Oceanic offer sizes up to a men's 13.

6. When you purchase scuba gear, be aware of the retailer's return and exchange policy. Know ahead of time if you will be able to return merchandise that is defective or that you simply don't like.



Reference: http://www.ehow.com/how_5562419_buy-plus-size-scuba-gear.html







Tuesday, November 18, 2014

CRESSI TRAVELIGHT BCD SCUBA DIVING GEAR TRAVEL PACKAGE SET - LIMITED QUANTITY

Still on our holiday gift series, here's a travel package set for all scuba diving enthusiasts out there. If you haven't decided on a a present to give to your loved ones, or even for yourself, this is the most ideal scuba diving gear set yet!

Not only is it great for traveling scuba divers, they're guaranteed worth the value too! Hurry now to enjoy great savings from the original retail price of $1429.75


This set is of limited quantity only so check out the scuba diving gear travel package set from Cressi right away!

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Technical Diving Guide: Securing a Can Light

Technical diving is an extreme sport that evolved from recreational diving. It requires advanced training, extensive experience and specialized equipment. Scuba diving allows you to move through a weightless environment, interacting with the underwater world. A canister light helps divers navigate, read gauges on their equipment and communicate with other divers.
Instructions

Loosen both fasteners on the canister dive light with the flat-head screwdriver.
       
Slide the canister mounting strap between one of the fasteners and the dive light's exterior. Pull it beneath, then repeat for the second fastener. The strap should hang out both ends equally.


Tighten the fasteners on the canister dive light, using the flat-head screwdriver. Don't over-tighten them, since pressure will help hold everything in place when you're underwater.


Assemble your dive kit by attaching the buoyancy control device (BCD) to the empty dive tank. Pull the BCD over the tank, adjusting its strap, then lock it into place. Disengage the dust cap on the air regulators by unscrewing the knob, place the regulators over the tank spout and gently twist the knob into position, hand-tight.


Unscrew the two medium quick links on the canister dive light.


Find the two holes about 7 inches apart on the right side of metal back plate attached to the BCD. Hook one quick link through the hole and screw it closed; repeat with the second quick link. Be sure the canister dive light is parallel to the dive tank.


Pull the dive light cord between the BCD metal back plate and the dive tank and drape the cord over the left shoulder, clipping it into the front chest strap.


Attach the quick-release carabiner to a D-ring on the left pocket of the BCD. Clip the handle of the canister dive light onto the carabiner for easy accessibility while technical diving.


Reference: http://www.ehow.com/how_8001514_secure-can-light-tech-diving.html







Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Scuba Diving Gifts: Spearfishing Wet Suits

Another holiday is coming up and you're running out of options to give to your spouse? If he's into scuba diving or spearfishing, then you need not worry as there are plenty of spearfishing wet suits and accessories that you can choose from.

Find out the right fit for your husband with these spearfishing options:


CRESSI SPEARFISHING TECNICA 2-PIECE 7MM WETSUIT


PALANTIC SPEARFISHING 7MM NEOPRENE CAMOUFLAGE STRETCH MAX FARMER JOHN WETSUIT


PALANTIC SPEARFISHING 5MM NEOPRENE CAMOUFLAGE STRETCH MAX FARMER JOHN WETSUIT

PALANTIC SPEARFISHING CAMOUFLAGE 3MM NEOPRENE GLOVES





Thursday, November 6, 2014

Great Gift Ideas for Scuba Diving Enthusiasts

Are you stuck on what's the best present for your loved ones this coming holidays? Thanksgiving and Christmas is just around the corner so we've rounded up some great gift ideas for any scuba diving enthusiast. Feel free to check them out and leave us an inquiry on the comment section.


PALANTIC XTREME 40LBS DONUT WING DOUBLE TANK W/ SS BACKPLATE & HARNESS BASIC SET + TANK HOLDER

PALANTIC XTREME 40LBS DONUT WING SINGLE TANK SS BACKPLATE & HARNESS DELUXE SET






PALANTIC XTREME 30LBS DONUT WING SINGLE TANK SS BACKPLATE & HARNESS DELUXE SET





PALANTIC XTREME 30LBS DONUT WING SINGLE TANK W/ SS BACKPLATE & HARNESS BASIC SET




PALANTIC XTREME TECH DIVING DONUT WING DOUBLE TANK 40LBS


TECHICAL DIVING STAINLESS STEEL BACKPLATE W/ HARNESS SYSTEM + BACKPAD + TANK BELT




Tuesday, November 4, 2014

How to Get Started on Ice Diving (Part 2)

(continued from Part 1)

Procedures – teamwork makes it safe

Ice diving is a team sport that requires more than just the diver, but also a surface crew. Often, the diver will enter the water alone, but be tethered to the surface and the exit hole through the lifeline mentioned above. A line tender stands by the exit hole and feeds line and reels it in as needed.



A system of communication is used between the diver and the line tender, typically one tug for OK (used by both the diver and the tender, similar to the “OK” sign in SCUBA hand signals), two tugs for “take in rope”, and a series of rapid tugs used to signal an emergency. If this happens, the tender immediately starts reeling in the rope, pulling the diver towards the exit.

A fully equipped safety diver should be standing by at the surface, with a line tethered to him/her. In case of an emergency, the safety diver can jump in come to the aid of the diver.

In addition to these roles, other surface crew members might be there to assist the diver when exiting and in getting out of the dive kit and getting warmed up. As well as keeping their eyes open for any shits in the ice that may pose a threat for the diver or other members of the team.

Gas management should be a major priority, using the same rules as in other overhead environments, typically one third for the swim out, one third for the swim back, and one third for backup.

How to Get Started

Ice diving in an advanced form of diving that shouldn’t be undertaken without proper training. All of the major organizations have ice diving courses, and these are highly recommended.

In addition to this, there a number of this a diver can do to get started safely with ice diving.

First, dive with experienced ice divers on your first outings. This will allow you to learn from others experience while increasing your own.

Also, consider starting you ice diving early in the season, where you can dive under a thin layer of ice that can be broken with relative ease in case of an emergency (making it a sort of semi-overhead environment). In this case, the entry and exit needs to happen from shore, as ice this thin will not support the weight of the diver or the surface crew.

Ice diving is a truly unique type of diving, that offers experiences that no other form of diving can. To really appreciate the feeling of being upside down that can be had during an ice dive, check out the video, made a group of Finnish divers:

Reference: http://www.dive.in/articles/ice-overhead-getting-started-on-ice-diving/







Thursday, October 30, 2014

How to Get Started on Ice Diving (Part 1)

When the weather gets cold, many divers hang up their kit and hibernate for the winter. It doesn’t need to be like that, though, as we’ve already described here on Dive.in. One of the ways to dive through the winter is ice diving. In this article, we’ll take you through the basics of getting started on taking the cold plunge under the ice.

Ice diving is an advanced form of diving, that takes place in situations where the surface of the body of water you’re diving in has frozen solid. Because of this, ice diving is taking place in an overhead environment, where you cannot be sure you are able to surface in case you need air or in some other form of emergency.



DIVE KIT FOR ICE DIVING

Needless to say ice diving takes place in very cold environments, so all equipment used must be suited for this. And a good portion of special equipment is also needed.

SURFACE KIT

Both the divers and the surface crew (more on these later) need to dress appropriately for the cold weather on the surface. Dressing in layers, including head protection and gloves, will be a necessity in most situations.

And making a plan for how and where the diver will change into dry clothes and warm up following the dive is another key element. In some cases, simply being able to step out of a dry suit and get into a heated car is sufficient planning, but in other cases, heated shelters or similar may need to be set up on shore.

DIVE KIT
Dry suits should be considered as key kit, as is sufficient undergarments to stay warm. Hoods and gloves that are adequately warm are important, too, and here dry versions of both can be considered.

As ice diving is in an overhead environment, double tanks should be used, and all regulators should be cold water certified and well-serviced to avoid freezing and free flowing.

Ice divers are typically tethered, with a lifeline tied to a harness worn on top of the dry suit, but underneath the BC unit. This allows for easy communication and re-location in case of an emergency.

ICE PENETRATION KIT

A snow shovel is usually necessary to clear snow before breaking through the ice. And once the ice is cleared, an ice saw or chainsaw is often necessary to cut through the ice and make an entry/exit hole.



to be continued...

Reference: http://www.dive.in/articles/ice-overhead-getting-started-on-ice-diving/